Safety Shield

 

Become an active participant in the dissemination and further promotion of "Safety Culture" in the aviation sector!  

 

You may, if you wish so, to report through the options given below, an occurrence that you have been aware that took place in the airside area, or something that poses a threat to general Safety and/or Security of an airport. 

 

You can mention it by providing your contact details, or even anonymously, in order to be investigated under EC 996/2010 and EC 1018/2015. Under EC 376/2014 your report will be treated as confidential.

Submit a Mandatory Occurrence Report (MOR)

What consistutes a mandatorily reporting occurrence (according to EU Legislation)?


Remark: This Annex is structured in such a way that the pertinent occurrences are linked with categories of activities during which they are normally observed, according to experience, in order to facilitate the reporting of those occurrences. However, this presentation must not be understood as meaning that occurrences must not be reported in case, they take place outside the category of activities to which they are linked in the list.

1. AIR OPERATIONS

1.1. Flight preparation

(1) Use of incorrect data or erroneous entries into equipment used for navigation or performance calculations which has or could have endangered the aircraft, its occupants or any other person.

(2) Carriage or attempted carriage of dangerous goods in contravention of applicable legislations including incorrect labelling, packaging and handling of dangerous goods.

1.2. Aircraft preparation

(1) Incorrect fuel type or contaminated fuel.

(2) Missing, incorrect or inadequate De-icing/Anti-icing treatment.

1.3. Take-off and landing

(1) Taxiway or runway excursion.

(2) Actual or potential taxiway or runway incursion.

(3) Final Approach and Take-off Area (FATO) incursion.

(4) Any rejected take-off.

(5) Inability to achieve required or expected performance during take-off, go-around or landing.

(6) Actual or attempted take-off, approach or landing with incorrect configuration setting.

(7) Tail, blade/wingtip or nacelle strike during take-off or landing.

(8) Approach continued against air operator stabilised approach criteria.

(9) Continuation of an instrument approach below published minimums with inadequate visual references.

(10) Precautionary or forced landing.

(11) Short and long landing.

(12) Hard landing.

1.4. Any phase of flight

1) Loss of control.

2) Aircraft upset, exceeding normal pitch attitude, bank angle or airspeed inappropriate for the conditions.

3) Level bust.

4) Activation of any flight envelope protection, including stall warning, stick shaker, stick pusher and automatic protections.

(5) Unintentional deviation from intended or assigned track of the lowest of twice the required navigation performance or 10 nautical miles.

(6) Exceedance of aircraft flight manual limitation.

(7) Operation with incorrect altimeter setting.

(8) Jet blast or rotor and prop wash occurrences which have or could have endangered the aircraft, its occupants or any other person.

(9) Misinterpretation of automation mode or of any flight deck information provided to the flight crew which has or could have endangered the aircraft, its occupants or any other person.

1.5. Other types of occurrences

(1) Unintentional release of cargo or other externally carried equipment.

2) Loss of situational awareness (including environmental, mode and system awareness, spatial disorientation, and time horizon).

3) Any occurrence where the human performance has directly contributed to or could have contributed to an accident or a serious incident.

2. TECHNICAL OCCURRENCES

2.1. Structure and systems

(1) Loss of any part of the aircraft structure in flight.

(2) Loss of a system.

(3) Loss of redundancy of a system.

(4) Leakage of any fluid which resulted in a fire hazard or possible hazardous contamination of aircraft structure, systems or equipment, or which has or could have endangered the aircraft, its occupants or any other person.

(5) Fuel system malfunctions or defects, which had an effect on fuel supply and/or distribution.

(6) Malfunction or defect of any indication system when this results in misleading indications to the crew.

(7) Abnormal functioning of flight controls such as asymmetric or stuck/jammed flight controls (for example: lift (flaps/slats), drag (spoilers), attitude control (ailerons, elevators, rudder) devices).

2.2. Propulsion (including engines, propellers and rotor systems) and auxiliary power units (APUs)

(1) Failure or significant malfunction of any part or controlling of a propeller, rotor or powerplant.

(2) Damage to or failure of main/tail rotor or transmission and/or equivalent systems.

(3) Flameout, in-flight shutdown of any engine or APU when required (for example: ETOPS (Extended range Twin engine aircraft Operations), MEL (Minimum Equipment List)).

(4) Engine operating limitation exceedance, including overspeed or inability to control the speed of any high-speed rotating component (for example: APU, air starter, air cycle machine, air turbine motor, propeller or rotor).

(5) Failure or malfunction of any part of an engine, powerplant, APU or transmission resulting in any one or more of the following: (a) thrust-reversing system failing to operate as commanded; (b) inability to control power, thrust or rpm (revolutions per minute); (c) non-containment of components/debris.

3. INTERACTION WITH AIR NAVIGATION SERVICES (ANS) AND AIR TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT (ATM)

(1) Unsafe ATC (Air Traffic Control) clearance.

(2) Prolonged loss of communication with ATS (Air Traffic Service) or ATM Unit.

(3) Conflicting instructions from different ATS Units potentially leading to a loss of separation.

(4) Misinterpretation of radio-communication which has or could have endangered the aircraft, its occupants or any other person.

(5) Intentional deviation from ATC instruction which has or could have endangered the aircraft, its occupants or any other person.

4. EMERGENCIES AND OTHER CRITICAL SITUATIONS

(1) Any event leading to the declaration of an emergency (‘Mayday’ or ‘PAN call’).

(2) Any burning, melting, smoke, fumes, arcing, overheating, fire or explosion.

(3) Contaminated air in the cockpit or in the passenger compartment which has or could have endangered the aircraft, its occupants or any other person.

(4) Failure to apply the correct non-normal or emergency procedure by the flight or cabin crew to deal with an emergency.

(5) Use of any emergency equipment or non-normal procedure affecting in-flight or landing performance.

(6) Failure of any emergency or rescue system or equipment which has or could have endangered the aircraft, its occupants or any other person.

(7) Uncontrollable cabin pressure.

(8) Critically low fuel quantity or fuel quantity at destination below required final reserve fuel.

(9) Any use of crew oxygen system by the crew.

(10) Incapacitation of any member of the flight or cabin crew that results in the reduction below the minimum certified crew complement.

(11) Crew fatigue impacting or potentially impacting their ability to perform safely their flight duties.

5. EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT AND METEOROLOGY

(1) A collision or a near collision on the ground or in the air, with another aircraft, terrain or obstacle (1).

(2) ACAS RA (Airborne Collision Avoidance System, Resolution Advisory).

3) Activation of genuine ground collision system such as GPWS (Ground Proximity Warning System)/TAWS (Terrain Awareness and Warning

System) ‘warning’.

(4) Wildlife strike including bird strike.

(5) Foreign object damage/debris (FOD).

(6) Unexpected encounter of poor runway surface conditions.

(7) Wake-turbulence encounters.

8) Interference with the aircraft by firearms, fireworks, flying kites, laser illumination, high powered lights, lasers, Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems, model aircraft or by similar means.

(9) A lightning strike which resulted in damage to the aircraft or loss or malfunction of any aircraft system.

(10) A hail encounter which resulted in damage to the aircraft or loss or malfunction of any aircraft system.

(11) Severe turbulence encounter or any encounter resulting in injury to occupants or deemed to require a ‘turbulence check’ of the aircraft.

(12) A significant wind shear or thunderstorm encounter which has or could have endangered the aircraft, its occupants or any other person.

(13) Icing encounter resulting in handling difficulties, damage to the aircraft or loss or malfunction of any aircraft system.

(14) Volcanic ash encounter.

6. SECURITY

(1) Bomb threat or hijack.

(2) Difficulty in controlling intoxicated, violent or unruly passengers.

(3) Discovery of a stowaway.

(1) Obstacle includes vehicle.





Submit a Voluntary Report

Submit a Complaint Report Form